HIV Pathogenesis: Abstracts from the March 2017 Cleveland Immunopathogenesis Consortium Meeting

Michael M. Lederman

Abstract


The Cleveland Immunopathogenesis Consortium (CLIC) was launched in March 2004 by a small group of investigators (Ron Bosch, Jason Brenchley,  Steven Deeks, Danny Douek, Zvi Grossman, Robert Kalayjian, Clifford Harding, Michael Lederman, Leonid Margolis, Miguel Quinones, Benigno Rodriguez, Rafick Sekaly, Scott Sieg, and Guido Silvestri) who were increasingly persuaded that immune activation was an important driver of HIV pathogenesis. We met around a chalk board and scribbled our models of pathogenesis, designed some experiments then went back home to do them. We met again soon to review our new and unpublished findings that refined and shaped these models. The data presentations were short, informal and heavy on discussion. The model worked well, the consortium was productive and the meetings catalyzed numerous collaborations and scores of high impact papers. The CLIC (less formally, the Bad Boys of Cleveland [1]) has been meeting regularly since then. Consortium membership has expanded to include other investigators (some are listed in the presentations below). Whether the goal is to prevent the morbid complications of HIV infection, to understand the determinants of HIV persistence or the factors that protect from acquisition of infection, a more clear understanding of HIV immunopathogenesis is central. Here in this issue of Pathogens and Immunity is a brief summary of the most recent CLIC//BBC meeting held in Cleveland in March 2017.

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References


Check E. Bad Boys question received wisdom on HIV. Nature. 2006;443(7110):380-1. PubMed PMID: 17006482. doi: 10.1038/443380b


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